Histories

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New history books.


Daina Ramey Berry, Kali N. Gross
Description: An empowering history that emphasizes the stories of African American women to show how they are--and have always been--instrumental in shaping our country. Berry and Gross examine and celebrate Black womanhood, beginning with the first African women who arrived in the U.S. to African American women of today. They showcase Black women's lives with their many voices: enslaved women, freedwomen, religious leaders, artists, queer women, activists, and women who lived outside the law. This is a starting point for exploring Black women's history and a testament to the beauty, richness, rhythm, tragedy, heartbreak, rage, and enduring love that abounds in the spirit of Black women across the nation.
Call Number: 305.488 Ber
Format: Book
Date Added: Feb 18, 2020
Simon Parkin
Description: "The triumphant true story of the young women who helped to devise the winning strategy that defeated Nazi U-boats and delivered a decisive victory in the Battle of the Atlantic." -- From book jacket.
Call Number: 940.5451 Par
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Caroline Moorehead
Description: In the late summer of 1943, when Italy broke with the Germans and joined the Allies after suffering catastrophic military losses, an Italian Resistance was born. Four young Piedmontese women, Ada, Frida, Silvia and Bianca. living secretly in the mountains surrounding Turin, risked their lives to overthrow Italy's authoritarian government. They were among the thousands of Italians who joined the Partisan effort to help the Allies liberate their country from the German invaders and their Fascist collaborators. What made this partisan war all the more extraordinary was the number of women like this brave quartet who swelled its ranks.
Call Number: 940.5345 Moo
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Elisabeth Åsbrink, Saskia Vogel
Description: A story that centers on a young Jewish refugee's friendship with the future founder of IKEA. Otto Ullman, a Jewish boy, was sent from Austria to Sweden right before the outbreak of World War II. There he became best friends with Ingvar Kamprad, who would grow up to become the founder of IKEA. The thirteen-year-old Otto was granted permission to enter Sweden--in accordance with the Swedish archbishop's secret plan to save Jews on condition that they converted to Christianity. Otto found work as a farmhand at the Kamprad family's farm, and Ingvar and Otto became very close friends. But at the same time, Ingvar Kamprad was actively engaged in Nazi organizations and a great supporter of the fascist Per Engdahl. Elisabeth Åsbrink illustrates how Swedish society was infused with anti-Semitism and how families are shattered by war and asylum politics.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 940.5318 Asb
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Kim Ghattas
Description: Sunni Saudi Arabia and Shia Iran, once allies and twin pillars of US strategy in the region, became mortal enemies after 1979. Ghattas weaves together history, geopolitics, and culture to show how the 1979 Iranian revolution-- fueled by American policy-- fed intolerance, suppressed cultural expression, and encouraged sectarian violence from Egypt to Pakistan, leading to the assassination of countless intellectuals, the birth of groups like Hezbollah in Lebanon, the September 11th terrorist attacks, and the rise of ISIS. -- adapted from jacket
Call Number: 955.053 Gha
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Fergus M. Bordewich
Description: The story of how Congress helped win the Civil War--a new perspective that puts the House and Senate, rather than Lincoln, at the center of the conflict. This view of the Civil War overturns the popular conception that Abraham Lincoln single-handedly led the Union to victory and gives us a vivid account of the role Congress played in winning the war. Building a narrative around four influential members of Congress--Thaddeus Stevens, Pitt Fessenden, Ben Wade, and the pro-slavery Clement Vallandigham--Fergus Bordewich shows us how a newly empowered Republican party shaped one of the most dynamic and consequential periods in American history. From reinventing the nation's financial system to pushing President Lincoln to emancipate the slaves to the planning for Reconstruction, Congress undertook drastic measures to defeat the Confederacy, in the process laying the foundation for a strong central government that came fully into being in the twentieth century.-- From statement provided by the publisher.
Call Number: 973.71 Bor
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Anna Mae Duane
Description: James McCune Smith and Henry Highland Garnet met as schoolboys at the New York African Free School, an educational experiment created by founding fathers who believed in freedom's power to transform the country. Smith and Garnet's achievements were near-miraculous in a nation that refused to acknowledge black talent or potential. The sons of enslaved mothers, these schoolboy friends would go on to travel the world, meet Revolutionary War heroes, publish in medical journals, address Congress, and speak before cheering crowds of thousands. The lessons they took from their days at the school shed light on how antebellum Americans viewed black children as symbols of America's possible future. The story of their lives, their work, and their friendship testifies to the imagination and activism of the free black community that shaped the national journey toward freedom.
Call Number: 306.362 Dua
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Michael Chabon, Ayelet Waldman
Description: To mark its 100-year anniversary, the American Civil Liberties Union, with authors Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman, bring together original pieces inspired by historic ACLU cases. In 1920, a small group of idealists and visionaries, including Helen Keller, Jane Addams, Roger Baldwin, and Crystal Eastman, founded the American Civil Liberties Union. A century after its creation, the ACLU remains the nation's premier defender of the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution. Chabon and Waldman have curated an anthology of essays about landmark cases in the organization's one-hundred-year history, taking you inside the trials and the stories that have shaped modern life. These powerful stories remind us that the issues the ACLU has engaged over the past one hundred years remain as vital as ever today, and that we can never take our liberties for granted.
Call Number: 323.06 Fig
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Edward J. Larson
Description: A dual biography of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington, illuminating their partnership's enduring importance. Theirs was a three-decade-long bond that would forge the United States. Vastly different men, Benjamin Franklin--an abolitionist freethinker from the urban north--and George Washington--a slaveholding general from the agrarian south--were the indispensable authors of American independence and the two key partners in the attempt to craft a more perfect union at the Constitutional Convention, held in Franklin's Philadelphia and presided over by Washington. And yet their teamwork has been little remarked upon in the centuries since. Edward J. Larson shows that theirs was truly an intimate working friendship that amplified the talents of each for collective advancement of the American project. Rekindled during the Second Continental Congress in 1775, their friendship gained historical significance during the American Revolution, when Franklin led America's diplomatic mission in Europe (securing money and an alliance with France) and Washington commanded the Continental Army. Victory required both of these efforts to succeed, and success, in turn, required their mutual coordination and cooperation. In the 1780s, the two sought to strengthen the union, leading to the framing and ratification of the Constitution, the founding document that bears their stamp.--From publisher's website.
Call Number: 920 Lar
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Benjamin E. Park
Description: Benjamin E. Park excavates the brief, tragic life of a lost Mormon city, demonstrating that the Mormons are essential to understanding American history writ large. Using newly accessible sources, Park recreates the Mormons' 1839 flight from Missouri to Illinois. There, under the charismatic leadership of Joseph Smith, they founded Nauvoo, which shimmered briefly--but Smith's challenge to democratic traditions, as well as his new doctrine of polygamy, would bring about its fall. His wife Emma, rarely written about, opposed him, but the greater threat came from without: in 1844, a mob murdered Joseph, precipitating the Mormon trek to Utah. Throughout his chronicle, Park shows that far from being outsiders, the Mormons were representative of their era in their distrust of democracy and their attempt to forge a sovereign society of their own.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 289.3 Par
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Gillen D'Arcy Wood
Description: A history of the first race to Antarctica that weaves the great polar discoveries of the nineteenth century with scientific breakthroughs of the modern era. Antarctica, the ice kingdom hosting the South Pole, looms large in the human imagination. The secrets of this vast frozen desert have long tempted explorers, but its brutal climate and glacial shores notoriously resist human intrusion. This book tells a story of the pioneer nineteenth-century voyages, when British, French, and American commanders raced to penetrate Antarctica's glacial rim for unknown lands beyond. These intrepid Victorian explorers--James Ross, Dumont D'Urville, and Charles Wilkes--laid the foundation for our current understanding of Terra Australis Incognita. Today, the white continent poses new challenges, as scientists race to uncover Earth's climate history recorded in the south polar ice and ocean floor, and to monitor the increasing instability of the Antarctic ice cap, which threatens inundation of coastal cities worldwide. Interweaving the breakthrough research of the modern Ocean Drilling Program with the dramatic discovery tales of their Victorian-era forerunners, Gillen D'Arcy Wood describes Antarctica's role in a planetary drama of plate tectonics, climate change, and species evolution stretching back more than thirty million years. An original, multifaceted portrait of the polar continent emerges, illuminating our profound connection to Antarctica in its past, present, and future incarnations. A deep-time history, this book brings the remotest of worlds within close reach--an Antarctica vital to both planetary history and human fortunes.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 919.89 Woo
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Eddy de Wind
Description: Journal written in Auschwitz by Eddy de Wind, a Holocaust survivor. in the weeks following the camp's liberation by the Red Army. This book is the raw, true account of Eddy's experiences at Auschwitz. In stunningly poetic prose, he provides unparalleled access to the horrors he faced in the concentration camp. This poignant memoir is at once a moving love story, a detailed portrayal of the atrocities of Auschwitz, and an intelligent consideration of the kind of behavior--both good and evil--people are capable of.-- From publisher's description.
Call Number: 940.5318 Win
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Candacy A. Taylor
Description: This book explores the historical role and residual impact of the Green Book, a travel guide for black motorists. Published from 1936 to 1966, the Green Book was hailed as the "black travel guide to America." At that time, Black travelers couldn't eat, sleep, or buy gas at most white-owned businesses. The Green Book listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, and other businesses that were safe for black travelers. It was a resourceful and innovative solution to a horrific problem. It took courage to be listed in the Green Book, and this book celebrates the stories of those who put their names in the book and stood up against segregation. It shows the history of the Green Book, how we arrived at our present historical moment, and how far we still have to go when it comes to race relations in America.
Call Number: 973.0496 Tay
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Ellen Carol DuBois
Description: Explores the full scope of the movement to win the vote for women through portraits of its leaders and activists, including Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Sojourner Truth, Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett.
Call Number: 324.623 DuB
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Justus Rosenberg
Description: In 1937, as the Nazis gained control and anti-Semitism spread in the Free City of Danzig, a majority German city on the Baltic Sea, sixteen-year-old Justus Rosenberg was sent to Paris to finish his education in safety. Three years later, France fell to the Germans. Alone and in danger, penniless, and cut off from contact with his family in Poland, Justus fled south. A chance meeting led him to Varian Fry, an American journalist in Marseille helping thousands of men and women, including many artists and intellectuals, escape the Nazis. With his German background, understanding of French culture, and fluency in several languages, including English, Justus became an invaluable member of Fry's refugee network as a spy and scout. He flourished in the underground, handling counterfeit documents, secret passwords, black market currency, surveying escape routes, and dealing with avaricious gangsters. But when Fry was eventually forced to leave France, Gussie, as he was affectionately known, could not get out. For the next four years, Justus relied on his wits and skills to escape captivity, survive several close calls with death, and continue his fight against the Nazis, working with the French Resistance and later, becoming attached with the United States Army.-- From publisher's description
Call Number: 940.5318 Ros
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Nathan Raab, Luke Barr
Description: "A work that compellingly draws back the curtain on the activity of finding, authenticating, purchasing, and selling to collectors some of the most significant historical documents and artifacts of the past"-- Provided by publisher.
Call Number: 790.132 Raa
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Kent Garrett, Jeanne Ellsworth
Description: The untold story of the Harvard class of '63, whose Black students fought to create their own identities on the cusp between integration and affirmative action. In the fall of 1959, Harvard recruited eighteen "Negro" boys as an experiment, an early form of affirmative action. Four years later they would graduate as African Americans. Some fifty years later, Kent Garrett began to reconnect with his classmates and explore their vastly different backgrounds, lives, and what their time at Harvard meant. The authors recount how these young men broke new ground. By the time they were seniors, they would have demonstrated against injustice, had lunch with Malcolm X, experienced heartbreak and the racism of academia, and joined with their African national classmates to fight for the right to form an exclusive Black students' group. This is the story of brilliant, singular boys whose identities were changed at and by Harvard, and who, in turn, changed Harvard/-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 378.1982 Gar
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
John R. Bruning
Description: The astonishing untold story of the WWII airmen who risked it all in the deadly race to become the greatest American fighter pilot. In 1942, America's deadliest fighter pilot, or "ace of aces" -- the legendary Eddie Rickenbacker -- offered a bottle of bourbon to the first U.S. fighter pilot to break his record of twenty-six enemy planes shot down. Seizing on the challenge to motivate his men, General George Kenney promoted what they would come to call the "race of aces" as a way of boosting the spirits of his war-weary command. What developed was a wild three-year sprint for fame and glory, and the chance to be called America's greatest fighter pilot.
Call Number: 940.54 Bru
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Megan Kate Nelson
Description: A narrative account of the epic struggle for the West during the Civil War. Megan Kate Nelson explores the connections among the Civil War, the Indian wars, and western expansion, reframing the era as one of national conflict--involving not just the North and South, but also the West. Against the backdrop of this larger series of battles, Nelson introduces nine individuals: John R. Baylor, a Texas legislator who established the Confederate Territory of Arizona; Louisa Hawkins Canby, a Union Army wife who nursed Confederate soldiers back to health in Santa Fe; James Carleton, a professional soldier who engineered campaigns against Navajos and Apaches; Kit Carson, a famous frontiersman who led a regiment of volunteers against the Texans, Navajos, Kiowas, and Comanches; Juanita, a Navajo weaver who resisted Union campaigns against her people; Bill Davidson, a soldier who fought in all of the Confederacy's major battles in New Mexico; Alonzo Ickis, an Iowa-born gold miner who fought on the side of the Union; John Clark, a friend of Abraham Lincoln's who embraced the Republican vision for the West as New Mexico's surveyor-general; and Mangas Coloradas, a revered Chiricahua Apache chief who worked to expand Apache territory in Arizona. The Three-Cornered War sheds light on a forgotten chapter of American history.--From book jacket flap.
Call Number: 978.02 Nel
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Richard B. Frank
Description: The first book in a new three-volume history of the Asia-Pacific War. In 1937 the swath of the globe from India to Japan contained half the world's population, but only two nations with real sovereignty (Japan and Thailand) and two with compromised sovereignty (China and Mongolia). All other peoples in the region endured under some form of colonialism. Today the region contains nineteen major, fully sovereign nations. Tower of Skulls presents a unified account of the course and titanic impact of this part of the global war, which began the torturous route to twenty-first-century Asia. Covering with detail campaigns in China, Singapore, the Philippines, and Burma, as well as the attack on Pearl Harbor, it expands beyond military elements to highlight the critical political, economic, and social reverberations of the struggle. Finally, it provides a graphic depiction of the often forgotten but truly horrific death toll in the Asia-Pacific region--over 20 million--which continues to shape international relations today.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 940.5425 Fra
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Stephen Puleo
Description: The story of the mission that inspired a nation to donate massive relief to Ireland during the potato famine and began America's tradition of providing humanitarian aid around the world. More than 5,000 ships left Ireland during the great potato famine in the late 1840s, transporting the starving and the destitute away from their stricken homeland. The first vessel to sail in the other direction, to help the millions unable to escape, was the USS Jamestown, a converted warship, which left Boston in March 1847 loaded with precious food for Ireland. In an unprecedented move by Congress, the warship had been placed in civilian hands, stripped of its guns, and committed to the peaceful delivery of food, clothing, and supplies in a mission that would launch America's first full-blown humanitarian relief effort. Captain Robert Bennet Forbes and the crew of the USS Jamestown embarked on a voyage that began a massive eighteen-month demonstration of soaring goodwill against the backdrop of unfathomable despair--one nation's struggle to survive, and another's effort to provide a lifeline. The Jamestown mission captured hearts and minds on both sides of the Atlantic, of the wealthy and the hardscrabble poor, of poets and politicians. Forbes' undertaking inspired a nationwide outpouring of relief that was unprecedented in size and scope, the first instance of an entire nation extending a hand to a foreign neighbor for purely humanitarian reasons. It showed the world that national generosity and brotherhood were not signs of weakness, but displays of quiet strength and moral certitude. In Voyage of Mercy, Stephen Puleo tells the story of the famine, the Jamestown voyage, and the commitment of thousands of ordinary Americans to offer relief to Ireland, a groundswell that provided the collaborative blueprint for future relief efforts, and established the United States as the leader in international aid. The USS Jamestown's heroic voyage showed how the ramifications of a single decision can be measured not in days, but in decades.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 363.883 Pul
Format: Book
Date Added: May 15, 2020
Subscribe to New Best Fun List: Histories
A Black Women's History Of The United States
Daina Ramey Berry, Kali N. Gross
305.488 Ber
Last Stop Auschwitz : My Story Of Survival From Within The Camp
Eddy de Wind
940.5318 Win
A Game Of Birds And Wolves : The Ingenious Young Women Whose Secret Board Game Helped Win World War Ii
Simon Parkin
940.5451 Par
Overground Railroad : The Green Book And The Roots Of Black Travel In America
Candacy A. Taylor
973.0496 Tay
A House In The Mountains : The Women Who Liberated Italy From Fascism
Caroline Moorehead
940.5345 Moo
Suffrage : Women's Long Battle For The Vote
Ellen Carol DuBois
324.623 DuB
And In The Vienna Woods The Trees Remain : The Heartbreaking True Story Of A Family Torn Apart By War
Elisabeth Åsbrink, Saskia Vogel
940.5318 Asb
The Art Of Resistance : My Four Years In The French Underground : A Memoir
Justus Rosenberg
940.5318 Ros
Black Wave : The Saudi-Iran Wars On Religion And Culture That Destroyed The Middle East
Kim Ghattas
955.053 Gha
The Hunt For History : On The Trail Of The World's Lost Treasures--from The Letters Of Lincoln, Churchill, And Einstein To The Secret Recordings Onboard JFK's Air Force One
Nathan Raab, Luke Barr
790.132 Raa
Congress At War : How Republican Reformers Fought The Civil War, Defied Lincoln, Ended Slavery, And Remade America
Fergus M. Bordewich
973.71 Bor
The Last Negroes At Harvard : The Class Of 1963 And The Eighteen Young Men Who Changed Harvard Forever
Kent Garrett, Jeanne Ellsworth
378.1982 Gar
Educated For Freedom : The Incredible Story Of Two Fugitive Schoolboys Who Grew Up To Change A Nation
Anna Mae Duane
306.362 Dua
The Race Of Aces : WWII's Elite Airmen And The Epic Battle To Become The Master Of The Sky
John R. Bruning
940.54 Bru
Fight Of The Century : Writers Reflect On 100 Years Of Landmark Aclu Cases
Michael Chabon, Ayelet Waldman
323.06 Fig
The Three-cornered War : The Union, The Confederacy, And Native Peoples In The Fight For The West
Megan Kate Nelson
978.02 Nel
Franklin & Washington : The Founding Partnership
Edward J. Larson
920 Lar
Tower Of Skulls : A History Of The Asia-Pacific War, July 1937-May 1942
Richard B. Frank
940.5425 Fra
Kingdom Of Nauvoo : The Rise And Fall Of A Religious Empire On The American Frontier
Benjamin E. Park
289.3 Par
Voyage Of Mercy : The Uss Jamestown, The Irish Famine, And The Remarkable Story Of America's First Humanitarian Mission
Stephen Puleo
363.883 Pul
Land Of Wondrous Cold : The Race To Discover Antarctica And Unlock The Secrets Of Its Ice
Gillen D'Arcy Wood
919.89 Woo