Histories

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Tom Standage
Description: A look at the history of human transportation, from the invention of the wheel through the era of horsepower, trains, and bicycles, revealing how transportation inevitably shapes civilization.
Call Number: 388.09 Sta
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
David Rooney
Description: A history of timekeeping and how it has shaped our world. For thousands of years, people of all cultures have made and used clocks, from the city sundials of ancient Rome to the medieval water clocks of imperial China, hourglasses fomenting revolution in the Middle Ages, the Stock Exchange clock of Amsterdam in 1611, Enlightenment observatories in India, and the high-precision clocks circling the Earth on a fleet of GPS satellites that have been launched since 1978. Clocks have helped us navigate the world and build empires, and have even taken us to the brink of destruction. Elites have used them to wield power, make money, govern citizens, and control lives--and sometimes the people have used them to fight back. Through the stories of twelve clocks, this book brings pivotal moments from the past vividly to life. David Rooney takes us from the unveiling of al-Jazari's castle clock in 1206, in present-day Turkey; to the Cape of Good Hope observatory at the southern tip of Africa, where nineteenth-century British government astronomers moved the gears of empire with a time ball and a gun; to the burial of a plutonium clock now sealed beneath a public park in Osaka, where it will keep time for 5,000 years. Rooney shows, through these artifacts, how time has been imagined, politicized, and weaponized over the centuries--and how it might bring peace.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 681.113 Roo
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Tiya Miles
Description: "Sitting in the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture is a rough cotton bag, called "Ashley's Sack," embroidered with just a handful of words that evoke a sweeping family story of loss and of love passed down through generations. In 1850s South Carolina, just before nine-year-old Ashley was sold, her mother, Rose, gave her a sack filled with just a few things as a token of her love. Decades later, Ashley's granddaughter, Ruth, embroidered this history on the bag--including Rose's message that "It be filled with my Love always." Historian Tiya Miles carefully follows faint archival traces back to Charleston to find Rose in the kitchen where she may have packed the sack for Ashley. From Rose's last resourceful gift to her daughter, Miles then follows the paths their lives and the lives of so many like them took to write a unique, innovative history of the lived experience of slavery in the United States. The contents of the sack--a tattered dress, handfuls of pecans, a braid of hair, "my Love always"--speak volumes and open up a window on Rose and Ashley's world. As she follows Ashley's journey, Miles metaphorically "unpacks" the sack, deepening its emotional resonance and revealing the meanings and significance of everything it contained. These include the story of enslaved labor's role in the cotton trade and apparel crafts and the rougher cotton "negro cloth" that was left for enslaved people to wear; the role of the pecan in nutrition, survival, and southern culture; the significance of hair to Black women and of locks of hair in the nineteenth century; and an exploration of Black mothers' love and the place of emotion in history."-- Provided by publisher.
Call Number: 306.362 Mil
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Giles Milton
Description: "The lively, immersive story of the race to seize Berlin in the aftermath of World War II that fired the starting gun for the Cold War"-- Provided by publisher.
Call Number: 943.155 Mil
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Ada Ferrer
Description: In Cuba, the passing of Fidel Castro from this world and of Raaul Castro from power have raised urgent questions about the island's political future. In the United States, Obama's opening to Cuba, the reversal of that policy during Trump's administration, and Biden's apparent willingness to reinitiate open relations have made the nature of the historic relationship between the two nations a subject of debate once more. Now, Ada Ferrer delivers a chronicle of more than five hundred years of Cuban history, reconceived and written for a moment when history itself seems up for grabs. Starting on the eve of the arrival of Columbus and ending with the 2020 US presidential election, Cuba: this book provides a front-row seat as we witness the evolution of modern Cuba, with its history of conquest and colonization, of slavery and freedom, of independence and revolutions made and unmade. Ferrer explores the sometimes surprising, often troubled intimacy between Cuba and its neighbor to the north, documenting the influence of the United States on Cuba and also the many ways Cuba has been a recurring presence in US affairs.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 972.91 Fer
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Bryan Burrough, Chris Tomlinson, Jason Stanford
Description: Three noted Texan writers combine forces to tell the real story of the Alamo, dispelling the myths, exploring why they had their day for so long, and explaining why the ugly fight about its meaning is now coming to a head. Every nation needs its creation myth, and since Texas was a nation before it was a state, it's no surprise that its myths bite deep. There's no piece of history more important to Texans than the Battle of the Alamo, when Davy Crockett and a band of rebels went down in a blaze of glory fighting for independence from Mexico, losing the battle but setting Texas up to win the war. However, that version of events owes more to fantasy than reality. This book explains the true story of the battle against the backdrop of Texas's struggle for independence, then shows us how the sausage of myth got made in the Jim Crow South of the late 19th and early 20th century. Celebrating the Alamo has long had an echo of celebrating whiteness. The fight over the Alamo's meaning has become more pitched than ever in the past few years, even violent, as Texas's future begins to look more and more different from its past.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 976.4 Bur
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
John Sedgwick
Description: John Sedgwick recounts the decade-long fight between General William J. Palmer, the Civil War hero leading the "little family" of his Rio Grande, coming down from Denver, hoping to showcase the majesty of the Rockies, and William Barstow Strong, the hard-nosed manager of the corporate-minded Santa Fe, venturing west from Kansas. What begins as an accidental rivalry when the two lines cross in Colorado soon evolves into an all-out battle as each man tries to outdo the other--claiming exclusive routes through mountains, narrow passes, and the richest silver mines in the world; enlisting private armies to protect their land and lawyers to find loopholes; dispatching spies to gain information; and even using the power of the press and incurring the wrath of the God-like Robber Baron Jay Gould--to emerge victorious. By the end of the century, one man will fade into anonymity and disgrace. The other will achieve unparalleled success--and in the process, transform a sleepy backwater of thirty thousand called "Los Angeles" into a booming metropolis that will forever change the United States.
Call Number: 385.09 Sed
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Winifred Gallagher
Description: A history of the American West told through the pioneering women who used the challenges of migration and settlement as opportunities to advocate for their rights, and transformed the country in the process. Between 1840 and 1910, over half a million men and women traveled deep into the underdeveloped American West, the vast lands that extended from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean. Survival in this uncharted region required two hard-working partners, compelling women to take on equal responsibilities to men, proving to themselves--and their husbands--that they were capable of far more than society maintained. The women of the West rightly saw themselves as patriotic pioneers, vital contributors to westward expansion. By the mid-nineteenth century the fight for women's suffrage was radical but hardly new, until the women of the West changed the course. They established and managed schools, churches, and philanthropies; they ran for office, first for the school board but soon for local legislature. They successfully fought for the right to earn income, purchase property, and vote. In 1869, partly to lure more women past the Rocky Mountains, Wyoming gave women the vote. Utah, Colorado,and Idaho soon followed, and long before the Nineteenth Amendment of 1919 did so across the country, nearly every western state or territory had enfranchised women. Winifred Gallagher brings to life the little known and under-reported women who played monumental roles in this vibrant and transformative period in the history of the United States. -- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 305.409 Gal
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Scott Borchert
Description: "A literary history of the Federal Writers Project"-- Provided by publisher.
Call Number: 973.917 Bor
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Martin Dugard
Description: From Martin Dugard comes the spellbinding story of the Allied liberation of Paris from the grip of the Nazis during World War II.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 940.5421 Dug
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Philip D'Anieri
Description: "The Appalachian Trail is America's most beloved trek, with millions of hikers setting foot on it every year. Yet few are aware of the fascinating backstory of the oddballs and obsessives who helped bring it to life over the past century"-- Provided by publisher.
Call Number: 974 DAn
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Robert S. Levine
Description: The absorbing narrative of Frederick Douglass's heated struggle with President Andrew Johnson reveals a new perspective on Reconstruction's demise. When Andrew Johnson rose to the presidency after Abraham Lincoln's assassination, African Americans were optimistic that Johnson would pursue aggressive federal policies for Black equality. While Johnson had cast himself as a "Moses" for the Black community. Frederick Douglass, the country's most influential Black leader, increasingly doubted the president was sincere in supporting Black citizenship. In a dramatic meeting between Johnson and a Black delegation at the White House, the president and Douglass came to verbal blows over the fate of Reconstruction. Their animosity only grew as Johnson sought to undermine Reconstruction and conciliate leaders of the former Confederate states. Robert Levine recounts the conflicts that led to Johnson's impeachment from the perspective of Douglass and the wider Black community. He offers a fresh vision of the lost promise and dire failure of Reconstruction.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 973.8 Lev
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Mari K. Eder
Description: Inside the lives and experiences of fifteen unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told--for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 940.53 Ede
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Peter S. Canellos
Description: "The definitive, sweeping biography of an American hero who stood against all the forces of Gilded Age America to fight for civil rights and economic freedom: Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan"-- Provided by publisher.
Call Number: B Har
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Julie Kavanagh
Description: A work of historical true crime charting a pivotal event in the 19th century, the Phoenix Park murders in Dublin, that gripped the world and altered the course of Irish history, from journalist Julie Kavanagh.
Call Number: 941.5 Kav
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Nancy Marie Brown
Description: Nancy Marie Brown lays to rest the hoary myth that Viking society was ruled by men and celebrates the dramatic lives of female Viking warriors. In 2017, DNA tests revealed that a Viking warrior in a high-status grave in Birka, Sweden was actually a woman. This book weaves together archaeology, history, and literature to imagine her life and times, showing that Viking women had more power and agency than historians have imagined. Brown uses science to link the Birka warrior, whom she names Hervor, to Viking trading towns and to their great trade route east to Byzantium and beyond. She imagines her life intersecting with larger-than-life but real women, including Queen Gunnhild Mother-of-Kings, the Viking leader known as The Red Girl, and Queen Olga of Kyiv. Hervor's short, dramatic life shows that much of what we have taken as truth about women in the Viking Age is based not on data, but on nineteenth-century Victorian biases. Viking women in history, law, saga, poetry, and myth carry weapons.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 948.02 Bro
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Matt Siegel
Description: Matt Siegel sets out "to uncover the hidden side of everything we put in our mouths." Siegel also probes subjects ranging from the myths--and realities--of food as aphrodisiac, to how one of the rarest and most exotic spices in all the world (vanilla) became a synonym for uninspired sexual proclivities, to the role of food in fairy--and morality--tales. He even makes a well-argued case for how ice cream helped defeat the Nazis. This is a rich and satisfying exploration of the historical, cultural, scientific, sexual, and culinary subcultures of this most essential realm.--From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 641.3 Sie
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Roxane van Iperen, Joni Zwart
Description: During the Second World War two Jewish sisters--Janny and Lien Brilleslijper--run one of the largest hideaways in The Netherlands: The High Nest, a villa in The Gooi area. While the last remaining Jews are being hunted in The Netherlands, the lives of dozens of hideaways kept going for better or for worse, right under the noses of their National Socialist neighbours. Eventually, the nest is exposed and the Brilleslijper family put on one of the last transports to Auschwitz, along with the (Anne) Frank family. Roxane van Iperen offers a hugely compelling portrayal of courage, treason, and human resilience.
Call Number: 940.5318 Ipe
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Kate Moore
Description: 1860: As the clash between the states rolls slowly to a boil, Elizabeth Packard, housewife and mother of six, is facing her own battle. Threatened by Elizabeth's intellect, independence, and outspokenness, her husband of twenty-one years is plotting against her and makes a plan to put her back in her place. One summer morning, he has her committed to an insane asylum. The horrific conditions inside the Illinois State Hospital in Jacksonville, Illinois, are overseen by Dr. Andrew McFarland, a man who will prove to be even more dangerous to Elizabeth than her traitorous husband. Elizabeth is not the only sane woman confined to the institution. There are many rational women on her ward who tell the same story: they've been committed not because they need medical treatment, but to keep them in line--conveniently labeled "crazy" so their voices are ignored. They cannot possibly fight for themselves, but Elizabeth discovers that the merit of losing everything is that you then have nothing to lose.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 303.484 Moo
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
Curtis Wilkie
Description: The inside story of how a courageous FBI informant helped to bring down the KKK chapter responsible for a brutal civil rights-era killing. By early 1966, the civil rights work of Vernon Dahmer, head of the county chapter of the NAACP and an advocate for voter registration, was well-known in Mississippi. This put him in the crosshairs of the White Knights, one of the most violent sects of the KKK in the South--which carried out his murder in a raid that burned down his home and store. This account of the incident and its aftermath is a tale of obsession, in which the infamous Imperial Wizard Sam Bowers became so fixated on killing Dahmer that the bungled attack ultimately led to Bowers's downfall and the destruction of his racist organization. Drawing on the diary of a former Klan infiltrator who risked his life to help break the White Knights, journalist Curtis Wilkie brings fresh light to this chapter in the history of civil rights in the South.-- From statement provided by publisher.
Call Number: 305.8 Wil
Format: Book
Date Added: Sep 10, 2021
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A Brief History Of Motion : From The Wheel, To The Car, To What Comes Next
Tom Standage
388.09 Sta
The Appalachian Trail : A Biography
Philip D'Anieri
974 DAn
About Time : A History Of Civilization In Twelve Clocks
David Rooney
681.113 Roo
The Failed Promise : Reconstruction, Frederick Douglass, And The Impeachment Of Andrew Johnson
Robert S. Levine
973.8 Lev
All That She Carried : The Journey Of Ashley's Sack, A Black Family Keepsake
Tiya Miles
306.362 Mil
The Girls Who Stepped Out Of Line : Untold Stories Of The Women Who Changed The Course Of World War Ii
Mari K. Eder
940.53 Ede
Checkmate In Berlin : The Cold War Showdown That Shaped The Modern World
Giles Milton
943.155 Mil
The Great Dissenter : The Story Of John Marshall Harlan, America's Judicial Hero
Peter S. Canellos
B Har
Cuba : An American History
Ada Ferrer
972.91 Fer
The Irish Assassins : Conspiracy, Revenge, And The Phoenix Park Murders That Stunned Victorian England
Julie Kavanagh
941.5 Kav
Forget The Alamo : The Rise And Fall Of An American Myth
Bryan Burrough, Chris Tomlinson, Jason Stanford
976.4 Bur
The Real Valkyrie : The Hidden History Of Viking Warrior Women
Nancy Marie Brown
948.02 Bro
From The River To The Sea : The Untold Story Of The Railroad War That Made The West
John Sedgwick
385.09 Sed
The Secret History Of Food : Strange But True Stories About The Origins Of Everything We Eat
Matt Siegel
641.3 Sie
New Women In The Old West : From Settlers To Suffragists, An Untold American Story
Winifred Gallagher
305.409 Gal
The Sisters Of Auschwitz : The True Story Of Two Jewish Sisters' Resistance In The Heart Of Nazi Territory
Roxane van Iperen, Joni Zwart
940.5318 Ipe
Republic Of Detours : How The New Deal Paid Broke Writers To Rediscover America
Scott Borchert
973.917 Bor
The Woman They Could Not Silence : One Woman, Her Incredible Fight For Freedom, And The Men Who Tried To Make Her Disappear
Kate Moore
303.484 Moo
Taking Paris : The Epic Battle For The City Of Lights
Martin Dugard
940.5421 Dug
When Evil Lived In Laurel : The "White Knights" And The Murder Of Vernon Dahmer
Curtis Wilkie
305.8 Wil